The Desire for an Idealized Self

Both the religiously inclined and secular types strive to acquire a splendid false self. Between the two groups, the terminology may differ, but the game remains the same. The case of C. S. Lewis reveals that the desire for a splendid false self leads to self-alienation. (Photo: public domain) English author and academic C. S.…

Advertisements

The Morality of Robert Louis Stevenson

We revere Robert Louis Stevenson for his adventure novels, but he was not a genre writer in the modern sense of that term. While Black Arrow, Kidnapped, The Master of Ballantrae, and Treasure Island may seem like straightforward romantic picaresque yarns, Stevenson was always deeply concerned with the moral aspects of his story. Among his…

Your Worldview Will Sneak into Your Novel

The Concept of “World” in a Novel A novel’s “world” is the general impression readers absorb from the interwoven effects of plot, characters, authorial tone, atmosphere, and setting. Writers impart this vital yet elusive quality as their own worldview inevitably pervades the work. The process is partially inadvertent and the resulting worldview may differ somewhat…

Art Imitates and Instructs

In a two-sided manner, artists imitate life while presenting a moral or aesthetic message. (Image: public domain.) The Two Aspects of Art Art has a dual role: to imitate life and to instruct. Nowhere in art is this duality more important than in the art of writing. Words can tackle complex issues in ways that…

Indie Writers Are Artists Too

Fantasy author Brian S. Pratt is an excellent example of an indie writer who has achieved remarkable success. All writing is a kind of art. The most popular forms (fantasy, for instance, or horror and vampire novels) are examples of folk art. They are to literature what country music is to classical. (That is, unless…